AAAH Youth Health Conference 2019 Program

Click on the boxes below for further details of what is taking place during that session.

Wednesday 27th November

07:00
07:30
08:00
08:30
09:00
09:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
13:00
13:30
14:00
14:30
15:00
15:30
16:00
16:30
17:00
17:30
18:00
18:30
19:00
19:30
20:00
Concurrent 1
Concurrent 1

The world is becoming increasingly polarised. We see a rise of nationalism and popularism, For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people this brings unique challenges. Young people who are just starting to find their way, develop their identity and forge their way in the world this adds they face additional pressures. The unique pressures Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people face are usually ignored in favour of a pan Australia approach or only superficially addressed.Not only are the challenges primarily ignored, but the unique strengths and contributions also are often Aboriginal, and Torres Strait Islander people can contribute to Australia are not well understood. Aboriginal and Torrs Strait Islander young people are often portrayed as either the sinner or the saint. What impact does the ongoing marginalisation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have on them? And needs to be done to ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander succeed? Success as defined by them.With young people make up more than half of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population under the age of 25. They are our future. They are our emerging leaders. As health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people improve the young ones will be the Elders for the future. But is Australia ready for them?

Keynote: George Patton
The Middle Years in Health and Human Development: findings from the Childhood to Adolescent Transition Study (CATS)

The years from mid-primary through to early secondary school are sometimes called the ‘middle years’. It is a foundational life phase for all aspects of health and human development. It coincides for most with the transition through puberty. It is also the time of perhaps the most significant transition in educational life with the move from primary to secondary school. These are years of enormous growth both physically and emotionally and formative in terms of mental health and later-life resilience. Yet these years have been neglected in research with the predominant focus of most studies on the early years or later adolescence. This presentation will summarise some of the learnings from a unique Australian study of these years: the Childhood to Adolescence Transition Study (CATS). CATS has tracked an initial sample of over 1200 grade 3 children and their families annually on their journey through puberty to late secondary school. The study sits at the interface of health and education research, documenting major developmental determinants of both mental health and academic achievement.

Youth Forum (Young People Only)

Youth Forum (Young People Only)

Concurrent 2
Concurrent 2

The world is becoming increasingly polarised. We see a rise of nationalism and popularism, For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people this brings unique challenges. Young people who are just starting to find their way, develop their identity and forge their way in the world this adds they face additional pressures. The unique pressures Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people face are usually ignored in favour of a pan Australia approach or only superficially addressed.Not only are the challenges primarily ignored, but the unique strengths and contributions also are often Aboriginal, and Torres Strait Islander people can contribute to Australia are not well understood. Aboriginal and Torrs Strait Islander young people are often portrayed as either the sinner or the saint. What impact does the ongoing marginalisation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have on them? And needs to be done to ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander succeed? Success as defined by them.With young people make up more than half of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population under the age of 25. They are our future. They are our emerging leaders. As health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people improve the young ones will be the Elders for the future. But is Australia ready for them?

Concurrent Session: Oral Presentation
Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander Youth Health

Mieke Snijder: Strong & Deadly Futures: building resilience and preventing drug and alcohol use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous youth

Claire Treadgold: Supporting healthcare delivery to Indigenous children and adolescents: Starlight's Healthier Futures Initiative

Chris McKay: ‘Next Generation: Youth Wellbeing Study’: Chronic disease risk markers among Aboriginal adolescents

Christina Heris: "Don’t follow the smoke" – listening to the voices and experiences of Aboriginal adolescents in the SEARCH study

Christina Heris: The decline of smoking among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander secondary students: implications for future policy

Tara Purcell: Understanding the facilitators and barriers to primary health care for Indigenous adolescents: a systematic review

Concurrent Session: Oral Poster Session
Sexual and Reproductive Health

Kanwal Saleem: MULTICULTURAL COMMUNITY ACTION NETWORK (M-CAN) - A Community-led Initiative

Anna D Li: Experiences and unmet needs of adolescent girls with heavy menstrual bleeding and pain

Jessica Santos: Tapping on and Scoring Staples: Engaging marginalised youth into health care by overcoming financial barriers - An evaluation of brokerage provision and service access at the Kirketon Road Centre.

Alanna Ivory: Sexuality needs of the young person with cancer - are clinician's empowered?

Stanya Sharota, Anna Danyushevsky, Cagla Sanli: Condoms and Consultations: Complementary roles of an LHD Peer Education and Youth Advisory Committee

Douglas Russell: Young people’s perception of safety in youth-serving organisations is related to their quality of life … but not in every context

Laura E Anderson: All action no talk: Adolescents’ sexual communication in the digital age

Concurrent 3
Concurrent 3
Registration

Conference Opening

Keynote: Kareem El-Ansary, Australian Youth Representative to the United Nations
What I learnt from meeting over 10,000 young Australians this year.

Right now, over 50% of the world's population is under 30 years old. We’re the most educated generation in human history, yet 90% of us are living in developing countries. We’re the most connected generation in history, yet half of us still live in extreme poverty.

Young people are without question the most affected cohort of the population and we are the best placed to tackle the world’s greatest challenges, but rarely are we invited to be a part of the conversation around what our future will look like and what decisions are being made today.

For 6 months this year, I travelled across the country listening to young people from all walks of life. I visited over 50 towns and cities in all 8 states and territories, ran over 230 diverse consultations and asked over 10,000 young people what they care about and how they see their future.

In this session, I will discuss what I learnt from them.

Keynote: George Patton Professorial Fellow in Adolescent Health Research, University of Melbourne
The Middle Years in Health and Human Development: findings from the Childhood to Adolescent Transition Study (CATS)

George Patton - Professorial Fellow in Adolescent Health Research, University of Melbourne.

The years from mid-primary through to early secondary school are sometimes called the ‘middle years’. It is a foundational life phase for all aspects of health and human development. It coincides for most with the transition through puberty. It is also the time of perhaps the most significant transition in educational life with the move from primary to secondary school. These are years of enormous growth both physically and emotionally and formative in terms of mental health and later-life resilience. Yet these years have been neglected in research with the predominant focus of most studies on the early years or later adolescence.

This presentation will summarise some of the learnings from a unique Australian study of these years: the Childhood to Adolescence Transition Study (CATS). CATS has tracked an initial sample of over 1200 grade 3 children and their families annually on their journey through puberty to late secondary school. The study sits at the interface of health and education research, documenting major developmental determinants of both mental health and academic achievement.

Morning Tea

Concurrent Session: Oral Presentation
Chronic Illness

Claire Masula: Meeting unpredictability with flexibility; Responsive support for young people living with cancer.

Jane Gauci: What is known about the effectiveness of self-management programs for adolescents with a chronic illness?

Alexandra Rushworth, Sarah Kilgour: A multidisciplinary rehabilitation model of care for adolescents with complex chronic conditions

Richard A Lewandowski: The Burden of Illness in Young Adults with Congenital Facial Deformities

Ciara MC Stapleton: Hot, bothered, and burnt out: Diabetes distress for children and teens living with insulin dependent diabetes in the Top End of the Northern Territory.

Lunch

Keynote: Summer May Finlay - PHD candidate, University of South Australia
Walking in the footsteps of ancestors: young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people making their way in a new world

Summer May Finlay (CSCA, TAE, BSocSC and MPHA) - PHD candidate, University of South Australia

The world is becoming increasingly polarised. We see a rise of nationalism and popularism, For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people this brings unique challenges. Young people who are just starting to find their way, develop their identity and forge their way in the world this adds they face additional pressures. The unique pressures Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people face are usually ignored in favour of a pan Australia approach or only superficially addressed.

Not only are the challenges primarily ignored, but the unique strengths and contributions also are often Aboriginal, and Torres Strait Islander people can contribute to Australia are not well understood. Aboriginal and Torrs Strait Islander young people are often portrayed as either the sinner or the saint. What impact does the ongoing marginalisation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have on them? And needs to be done to ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander succeed? Success as defined by them.

With young people make up more than half of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population under the age of 25. They are our future. They are our emerging leaders. As health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people improve the young ones will be the Elders for the future. But is Australia ready for them?

Keynote: Andrew Fuller
From Surviving to Thriving- Engaging Tricky Teens

Tricky teens often do the same things in the same ways over and over again. Having spent most of a lifetime thinking about ‘what the hell do I do now?’ with these kids Andrew will share some thoughts and methods he has found worked … most of the time.

Keynote: Andrew Fuller
From Surviving to Thriving- Engaging Tricky Teens

Tricky teens often do the same things in the same ways over and over again. Having spent most of a lifetime thinking about ‘what the hell do I do now?’ with these kids Andrew will share some thoughts and methods he has found worked … most of the time.

Keynote: Andrew Fuller

Keynote: Andrew Fuller - Clinical Psychologist
From Surviving to Thriving- Engaging Tricky Teens

Andrew Fuller - Clinical Psychologist

Andrew is a Fellow at the University of Melbourne and has been a scientific consultant for the ABC. He is an ambassador for Adolescent Success, the Lion’s Club Alcohol and Drug Awareness Foundation and Mind Matters

Tricky teens often do the same things in the same ways over and over again. Having spent most of a lifetime thinking about ‘what the hell do I do now?’ with these kids Andrew will share some thoughts and methods he has found worked … most of the time.

Launch of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Youth Health Position Paper

Launch of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Youth Health Position Paper

Kate Thompson and Rohan Borschmann

Afternoon Tea

Concurrent Session: Oral Poster Session
Mixed Themes

Jane Ho: Growing AYA services for our hospital

Ani Wierenga: Adolescent Health and Wellbeing: Building bridges of trust

Jenny A Garnsey: Hellyer Student Residence student support model.

Kim Jose: Establishing a young adult renal and transplant clinic in a regional setting: ‘It’s great that we’re not alone’

Bianca Forrester: “One-size doesn’t fit all”: responding to the complexity of implementing health clinics in Victorian secondary schools.

Rachel L Buckley: Improving the quality of hospital care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adolescents.

Dr Andrew Ramsay: The Peace Education Program in Commit2Change in Alice Springs Daria Westerman: Occupational Therapy – A Future Leader in Adolescent Healthcare

Young People Performance - shOUT Youth Chorus
shOUT Youth Chorus

shOUT (formerly the Melbourne Gay and Lesbian Youth Chorus) was founded in 2005, and is Australasia’s first LGBTQI+ youth chorus. We provide young people aged between 18 and 29 with a fantastic, safe and friendly environment in which to develop their singing skills.shOUT is a chorus of the Melbourne Gay and Lesbian Chorus (MGLC) – in other words, a “choir within a choir”. With our own weekly rehearsals, we explore great music through singing, and along with MGLC, perform at various events around Melbourne and Victoria each year.

Welcome Reception

Concurrent 4
Concurrent 4

Concurrent Session: Oral Presentation
Mental Health and Resilience

Ruth E Crowther: Digital mental health resources for young people: a guide to finding evidence-based digital mental health programs and apps you can trust.

Rohan Borschmann: Self-harm in primary school-aged children and adolescents: prospective cohort study

Rohan Borschmann: The health of adolescents detained under the youth justice system: a global scoping review

Sally Bradford: Lifeline Text: A suicide prevention service in the pocket of Australia’s youth

Simon Denny: The association between the experience of violence, bullying and harassment on the mental health of secondary school students

Laura Beaton: Australia’s new national digital health record system: toward a co-designed health access literacy intervention for adolescents in a school-based health service

Concurrent Session: Symposium
HPV and related disease in Australia - is the end in sight?

Objectives: 1) To update participants on Australia’s National HPV vaccination program and changes to the national cervical screening program; 2) To develop an understanding of HPV related infection and disease and the role of vaccination and screening in its prevention; 3) To recognise that ongoing inequities of access to HPV vaccination and cervical screening exist in Australia and our region and to learn about strategies which may address these barriers to access. 4) To understand the important role advocacy plays in addressing health inequities, and your role in the promotion of strategies for collective action and positive change. Process: A series of short, cutting edge presentations from leading experts in the field including a young Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander (TBC).

Content summary: This symposium will address: • The National HPV Vaccination Program in Australia and its impact on HPV related infection and disease. • Overview of changes to the cervical screening program in Australia and the impact this is predicted to have on cervical cancer. • What the World Health Organization call for elimination of cervical cancer means for Australia and our region. • Addressing inequities of access to vaccination and cervical screening, with a focus on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and our region: advocacy strategies, pathways, partnerships, and policy. • School based vaccination: identifying gaps, improving processes and adolescent experience of vaccination.

Expertise: World leading experts in HPV-related infection and disease, epidemiology, vaccination, adolescent and young women’s sexual and reproductive health, school-based vaccination, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, human rights and advocacy.

Concurrent Session: Symposium
HPV and related disease in Australia - is the end in sight?

Cristyn Davies, Deborah bateson, Julia Brotherton, Tamara Butler, Kristy Meiselbach, Rachel Skinner, Cassandra Vujovich-Dunn

Objectives: 1) To update participants on Australia’s National HPV vaccination program and changes to the national cervical screening program; 2) To develop an understanding of HPV related infection and disease and the role of vaccination and screening in its prevention; 3) To recognise that ongoing inequities of access to HPV vaccination and cervical screening exist in Australia and our region and to learn about strategies which may address these barriers to access. 4) To understand the important role advocacy plays in addressing health inequities, and your role in the promotion of strategies for collective action and positive change. Process: A series of short, cutting edge presentations from leading experts in the field including a young Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander (TBC).

Content summary: This symposium will address: • The National HPV Vaccination Program in Australia and its impact on HPV related infection and disease. • Overview of changes to the cervical screening program in Australia and the impact this is predicted to have on cervical cancer. • What the World Health Organization call for elimination of cervical cancer means for Australia and our region. • Addressing inequities of access to vaccination and cervical screening, with a focus on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and our region: advocacy strategies, pathways, partnerships, and policy. • School based vaccination: identifying gaps, improving processes and adolescent experience of vaccination.

Expertise: World leading experts in HPV-related infection and disease, epidemiology, vaccination, adolescent and young women’s sexual and reproductive health, school-based vaccination, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, human rights and advocacy.

Concurrent 5
Concurrent 5

Concurrent Session: Oral Presentation
Other Topics

Daniel Waller: An Exploration of Australian Federal and State Policy on the Health of Young People: A Scoping Review

Melissa Kang: “She helped with everything…she linked me in”: evaluation of a pilot youth health navigator role in emergency departments.

Ying Ying Liew: Experiences of healthcare navigation and access in NSW for young people of refugee background

Megan Lim: REACHING YOUNG PEOPLE WITH HEALTH PROMOTION ON SOCIAL MEDIA

Emma M Heard, Rowan Evans: Random Acts of Respect: Promoting ethical bystander intervention among a university student community

Stanya Sharota: 8 for Feeling Great: A School-based Healthy Lifestyle Project for Vulnerable Newly Arrived Migrants and Refugee Young People

Concurrent Session: Symposium
Koori Youth Council: ‘Ngaga-dji (hear me) young voices creating change for justice’ Taking action on the youth justice system for our children and young people

Ngaga-dji (hear me) captures the voices and experiences of Aboriginal children in Victoria’s youth justice system www.ngaga-djiproject.org.au . Ngaga-dji is the first time that these children will have their voices heard, giving society and governments the chance to understand how policy choices affect children’s lives and the future of our communities.

Based on yarning circles, Ngaga-dji presents solutions from children behind bars who are speaking up about their experiences. These children’s experiences are the missing piece of the youth justice conversation, they hold the key to justice solutions that work. By listening, valuing and acting on these recommendations, the Victorian Government and opposition can create a system that supports Aboriginal children to thrive in their communities.

The Koorie Youth Council (KYC) invites all conference delegates, particularly those involved in advocacy and justice work, to join us to discuss the stories and solutions in the Ngaga-dji report. Topics will include: self-determined youth support systems, advocating for a prison-free youth justice system, youth voice and participation.

KYC will do a presentation on Ngaga-dji to delegates to share related experiences, reflections and bring their own wisdom to Ngaga-dji from across the country. We will collect these responses on the Ngaga-dji banner, which captures voices of young people, community and advocates across the country.

Participants will gain a deep understanding of the Ngaga-dji project, the youth justice system in Victoria and the pathway to change.

Wednesday 27th November

Thursday 28th November

08:00
08:30
09:00
09:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
13:00
13:30
14:00
14:30
15:00
15:30
16:00
16:30
17:00
Concurrent 1
Concurrent 1

Concurrent Session: Oral Presentation
Mental Health and Resilience

Ann-Maree Duncan: What factors influence mental health of international students? A cross-sectional survey of Australian University students

Jacqueline Kuruppu: Colour the grey: Enablers to responding to child abuse and neglect in primary care settings.

Shaun D'Souza: Resilience, Identity, Labels and Pride - LGBTIQAP+ Youth in Transition

Karly Cini: Matching action to need: An analysis of adolescent health needs in Myanmar.

Annie Carter: Substance use among young people in the Pacific Island Countries and Territories: what we do and don’t know

Nisaa Wulan: Establishing the population prevalence of mental health problems amongst Indonesian adolescents

Concurrent Session: Symposium
ChIPS Melbourne & ChiPs Sydney - The recipe for success in peer support Harry Brown

Objectives:

The audience will gain an in-depth overview of the Chronic Illness Peer Support (ChIPS) program from the perspective of both program participants and staff facilitators. ChIPS has been run through the Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne since the early 90’s and most recently the Sydney Children’s Hospital, Randwick since Sept 2018. ChIPS is for people between the ages of 12 – 25 living with chronic illness. The presentation will deliver the essential requirements to structure and roll out a successful peer led youth program and include the young person perspective.

Process:

ChIPS program staff from Melbourne and Sydney will deliver a short (10-15mins) keynote presentation providing an overview of the program with a focus on crucial processes to create a truly effective youth participation model. This will be followed by a facilitated panel discussion with 4-6 participants of the Melbourne program to give their perspective and share their journeys in ChIPS.

Content Summary

Young people with chronic illness are often socially isolated, find it difficult to connect with peers, miss out on recreational activities and leadership opportunities. ChIPS exists to fill these gaps. Content will include program structure and processes, plus key learnings and strategies to build a program from the ground up. Covering marketing and active promotion within the hospital, networking, enhancing referral and assessment processes, and general program activities and development. The young people will talk about the impact the program has had on their lives and how they make active program decisions.

Expertise:

This presentation offers three areas of expertise. Firstly from staff members of an established program in Melbourne, secondly from the Sydney team who have expertise in building a ChIPS program from the ground up and thirdly from the young people in the program who ensure ChIPS is always evolving to meet their needs.

Concurrent 2
Concurrent 2

Concurrent Session: Oral Presentation
Youth Participation and Leadership

Elissa Phillips: Enriching developmental research with adolescent voices: insights from the Childhood to Adolescence Transition Study (CATS)

Georgia Carr: No-one else was doing it: Young people teaching and empowering young people on issues of gender

Alice Zhang: “Capturing a snapshot of the youth voice”: youth participation in the Access 3 study

Renae Kirkham: Co-designing health and wellbeing research priorities in the NT

Courtney Venaglia: Ask for Health- improving health literacy for young people through using youth participation.

Skye Deards: LiveLab: The development of a youth leadership program supporting the Livewire online community

Concurrent Session: Symposium
Megan Lim: HOW TO INTEGRATE CO-DESIGN METHODS INTO HEALTH RESEARCH

Objectives

Best practice health promotion interventions are responsive to the needs, wants and experiences of target populations. However, it can be difficult to understand the needs and wants of vulnerable young people. The co-design process, based on human-centred design theory, prioritises users throughout the creation of a product, rather than at the start or end. Co-design methods involve an iterative process of engagement with users to understand their lived experience, enable them to define the issues and empower them to co-create a solution. You will learn how to conduct co-design workshops and to utilise the methodology in your own work.

We will work on a complex problem that we are currently facing in our research; how might we conduct research about online pornography with adolescents? We know that the median age that young people view pornography is between 11-13 years, however, engaging children this young in research on such a sensitive topic is very challenging.

Process

The symposium will be run as a co-design workshop, with us as the facilitators and you as the participants and co-designers. We will use creative and generative activities throughout the workshops to engage you as participants in the design process, working towards designing a solution to our research problem. Workshops will incorporate four phases adapted from design thinking; understand, define, ideate & design.

Content Summary

We’ll go through the co-design process with you, demonstrating activities and materials. But the content is up to you! We’ll guide you through the process, but we want you to design the solutions. We promise it will be fun and engaging.

Expertise

We are young people’s health researchers with public health and health promotion research expertise. We have facilitated co-design workshops with young people to discuss sensitive health topics such as sex and relationships, body image, and alcohol consumption.

Concurrent 3
Concurrent 3
Registration

Keynote: Georgie Harman - CEO beyondblue
The time is now: structural reform for better mental health for generations to come

Georgie Harman - CEO beyondblue


Georgie was appointed as the CEO of beyondblue in May 2014 where she has led a significant expansion of effort and results in service innovation, suicide prevention and digital solutions.


Previously, she was the Deputy CEO of the National Mental Health Commission, providing independent advice to government on mental health reform


We know that childhood experiences shape the adults we become and that mental health in the foundation years can affect the course of the rest of our lives. Children who have good mental health and the resilience to bounce back from early adversity can carry it with them through adulthood and pass it on to the generations that follow.


Georgie looks into the challenges that lie ahead in closing gaps in critical areas for prevention and early intervention, nurturing resilience through everyday strategies, mobilising community-based supports and the importance of developing an integrated system that promotes wellbeing for all.

Keynote: Stuart Kinner - Head, Justice Health Unit, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute & University of Melbourne
Health inequalities and the youth justice system

Stuart Kinner - Head, Justice Health Unit, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute & University of Melbourne


His research focusses on the health of adolescents and adults who have contact with the criminal justice system.


Adolescents who have contact with the youth justice system are distinguished by entrenched and often intergenerational disadvantage, histories of trauma and neglect, and a high prevalence of co-occurring health and neurodevelopmental difficulties. Contact with the youth justice system provides rare opportunities to identify and initiate care for under-treated health conditions, and address social determinants of health such as education and housing.


However, at present remarkably little is known about the health of justice-involved adolescents in Australia, and investment in efforts to improve their health outcomes is woefully inadequate. Addressing the health-related needs of justice-involved adolescents is important to reducing health inequalities at the population level and, given the marked over-representation of young Indigenous people in the youth justice system, to closing the gap.

Morning Tea

Concurrent Session: Oral Presentation
Sexual and Reproductive Health

Sophie GE Kezidor: Promoting connectedness among adolescents to improve sexual and reproductive health outcomes: a Systematic Review

Erin Donnelly: Embracing the future: Engaging parents and carers in improving puberty, sexuality and relationships support for children and young people with intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders

Michelle Raggatt: EVALUATION OF A CO-DESIGNED SEXUAL HEALTH AND PORNOGRAPHY LITERACY DIGITAL RESOURCE FOR VULNERABLE YOUNG PEOPLE

Jana K Ventura: Strengthening resilience in young migrants through cultural arts, reflection and self-inquiry

Rhiannon Jennings: Sexy & Safe - Let's Talk About It

Tanya Montoya: Let’s Chatbot About Sex: Conversational marketing in sexual health promotion

Lunch

Panel Session 'Raising our Voice: advocacy and owning future change': Michelle Telfer, Isabelle Langley, Cristyn Davies

Michelle Telfer - Paediatrician And Adolescent Physician Director, Department Of Adolescent Medicine

Isabelle Langley - Youth Representative

Cristyn Davies - Senior Research Associate, Discipline Of Child & Adolescent Health, University Of Sydney

In Australia and globally, trans, gender diverse and non-binary (TGDNB) people experience significant barriers to accessing culturally safe healthcare. For TGDNB young people, accessing timely, culturally safe medical gender affirmation through publicly funded multidisciplinary health services results in improvements to physical health, mental health and wellbeing and maximisation of their social, educational and vocational potential. Focusing on health equity and human rights, panellists share their experiences of advocating in local, national and international forums to address barriers preventing young TGDNB people from equality of opportunity to enjoy the highest attainable level of health. Panellists address the mechanisms and mediators of change, reflecting on specific examples such as birth certificate law reform, landmark decisions made by the Family Court of Australia enabling access to medical gender affirmation, and advocating for access to and funding for clinical services and research. Panellists also highlight opportunities for peers and colleagues across sectors and settings to support health equity and human rights for young TGDNB people, their families and carers, health professionals and researchers.

Keynote: Susan Sawyer - Director, Centre for Adolescent Health
The Age of Adolescence

Professor Susan Sawyer, Director, Centre for Adolescent Health

Professor Susan Sawyer holds the Geoff and Helen Handbury Chair of Adolescent Health at the University of Melbourne. She is Director, Royal Children’s Hospital Centre for Adolescent Health, a World Health Organization collaborating centre

How we conceptualise and define adolescence influences the scope and focus of laws, policies and programmes that are intended to protect and empower young people. Different terms are used to define children, adolescents, youth and young people, with overlapping age definitions.

This presentation will highlight why more recent definitions of adolescence extend it from 10-19 years to 10-24 years. Examples will be presented of how the age scope of particular laws, social policies and service systems can be viewed in relation to the notion of balancing the value of engaging young people as active participants against the perceived risks that warrant a continuing level of care and protection.

Afternoon Tea

Concurrent Session: Symposium
Tatjana Ewais : Health and Law Partnerships in Youth with Chronic Illness

Objectives: It is well recognised that adolescents and young adults with chronic illnesses face multiple challenges when navigating their health needs alongside work, education, family and other social commitments. What is sometimes less well understood are the negative impacts of financial and legal issues, such as outstanding debt, tenancy problems, or problems accessing Centrelink benefits, on their health and wellbeing. Therefore, creating integrated services managing health, social and legal needs of youth with chronic illness is a priority and in keeping with the universal health coverage recommendations from the World Health Organisation and Australian Association for Adolescent Health. We will present an innovative model of care delivered by an integrated service for adolescents and young adults within a tertiary hospital that provides specialist health care alongside social, legal and mental health support.

Process: A narrative literature review illustrating the gaps in treatment of adolescents and young adults with chronic illness and unmet health, social and legal needs. Facilitated learning of key components of integrated care, inclusion of social determinants of health and legal needs check into assessment and treatment, with health and legal professionals working side by side within the interdisciplinary team.

Content summary: We will describe an integrated treatment model grounded in whole-person, recovery-focussed care, in a tertiary hospital for youth with chronic illness. Case based learning-three illustrative cases of young adults with chronic illness and multiple psychosocial and legal comorbidities. We present the data illustrating the social and legal issues from a representative sample of young people accessing specialist health care, and Health and Legal Clinic data.

Expertise: Five years in practicing integrated care in youth with chronic illness, within a tertiary teaching hospital. Establishment of the Health and Legal Clinic supported by the work of law, medical, nursing and social work students from University of Queensland.

Concurrent 4
Concurrent 4

Concurrent Session: Oral Presentation
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Youth Health / Leadership

Ian Williams: Health service use and unmet need: improving healthcare for young people

James A Smith: The development of a promising practice guide for improving the social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth

Ben Christie: Understanding health literacy among young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander males in the Northern Territory: Implications for policy and practice

Tirritpa Ritchie: Paving the path to accessible & responsive primary health care: Adapting WHO resources for use with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adolescents

Stanya Sharota, Anna Danyushevsky, Cagla Sanli: For US by US: Adapting the NSW Youth Friendly Checklist for Young People.

Concurrent Session: Symposium
K.C.:The Queer Experience

Objectives

Participants will

Hear real-life stories about queer young people’s experiences of accessing mental health support; Explore how these experiences might have relevance to their area of practice; Be challenged to identify ways to improve practice across the health sector to better support the needs of queer young people.

Process

The session will be highly interactive and engaging. It will include a presentation from young people with lived experience as well as interactive activities and discussions giving participants opportunities to deeply explore the subject matter and discover solutions that fit their context.

Content Summary

This workshop follows-on from one we delivered (with extremely positive responses from participants) at last year’s conference. Since then we have gained funding to undertake a project exploring queer young people’s experiences of accessing mental health services. We intend to use the data we collect to develop resources to enable the sector to better support queer young people, ultimately reducing the incidences of exclusion, re-traumatisation and even loss of life.

The content delivered will draw on the lived experience of the facilitators and the themes that are emerging through the project as it rolls out.

Expertise

Our expertise is drawn from a combination of: lived experience of a system that has failed us (as queer young people) personally on many fronts; the realities of many other young people we have met, surveyed or heard speak on their experiences; a literature review of material illustrating the queer experience of mental health services; and the workshops and presentations we have developed and delivered to date.

We are skilled and engaging facilitators with a recent history of extensive workshop development and delivery.

Concurrent 5
Concurrent 5

Concurrent Session: Oral Presentation
Mixed Themes

Hannah Mayr: Multidisciplinary lifestyle intervention in children and adolescents - results of the GRIT (Growth, Resilience, Insights, Thrive) pilot study

Frank Tracey: Planning for a better tomorrow: a population health approach to designing youth health and wellbeing services

Deepthi Iyer: Australian young women's perceptions of dating and dating violence

Hoi Lun (Helen) Cheng: Foot growth as a non-invasive marker of early puberty: findings from the ARCHER longitudinal adolescent cohort study

Melissa Willoughby: Increased risk of violence-related death among young people exposed to the youth justice system

Christine Cammell, Simon Denny: Preparing for the future of School Based Health Services

Concurrent Session: Symposium
Lena Sanci: Integrating health and education: challenges and successes with Victoria’s School-Based Health Service program

Objectives

International interest is growing in the potential of educational settings to improve young people’s health and wellbeing. In this symposium we will explore the health-education nexus, drawing on the Victorian government’sDoctors in Secondary Schools Program (DiSS) which delivers primary care services in 100 disadvantaged secondary schools. Delegates will learn about the complexities of working across the health and education sectors, engage with the diversity of perspectives and experiences of those involved in the Victorian program, and see the benefits of empowering young people, schools and clinicians to work together.

Process

The symposium panel will comprise key stakeholder representatives from the Victorian DiSS program: young people, school staff, clinicians, policy makers, clinical governance and support, and researchers/academics. Speakers will reflect on their experiences of designing, delivering, managing and participating in the initiative across its first 2 years of operation. Delegates can engage with panel members in discussion to further explore and workshop implementation of health-education initiatives.

Content Summary

We will explore the key themes of complexity, diversity, andempowerment in the context of delivering best practice youth friendly care in a secondary school. The panel will discuss key learnings on barriers and enablers to implementation drawing on concrete examples from the program and touching on the importance of continuous feedback loops, stakeholder consultations, and co-design.

Expertise

The panel brings together expertise in complex intervention design and implementation, educational policy, public health research, primary care, and importantly, direct lived experience from a consumer perspective. The panel will include:

Lena Sanci, Department of General Practice, University of Melbourne; Medical Advisor to DiSS two young people and school staff from a participating Victorian secondary school

Bianca Forrester, academic and General Practitioner

Nicole Green, Primary Care in Schools Lead, North Western Melbourne PHN

Petrina O’Connor, Project Director, Victorian Department of Education and Training

Thursday 28th November

Friday 29th November

07:00
07:30
08:00
08:30
09:00
09:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
13:00
13:30
14:00
14:30
15:00
15:30
16:00
16:30
17:00
Concurrent 1
Concurrent 1

Morning Symposium
Karen Spielman: Working well with GPs - enhancing the management of complexity on Youth Health

Objectives:

Understand the role of GPs in the community and in youth health Understand role of Practice Manager in youth settings and community GP Identify Youth Friendly GPs Communicate effectively with GPs Improve partnerships with GPs both within and external to youth services

Content Summary:

Outline role of GP- training, different skillsets, Medicare, training and resourcing, working with AHPs Outline role of practice manager including managing referrals & correspondence, supporting GPs in your service, supporting all staff to re-assess the role of GPs and supporting change and processes. Discuss what is a Youth Friendly GP, how to identify How a practice manager can support communication with local GPs and their practices Example of event held at Centre - Speed Dating preliminary research results??

Expertise:

headspace Bondi Junction has a thriving general practice which we believe is due to strong support from consortium, board and centre management. Sally Corry is a practice manager experienced in general medical practice and Dr Karen Spielman is GP Clinical Lead with excellent links in both local youth health and wider local medical community. We have worked together for the last 3-4 years to build the practice within the centre - growing from 4 hours to 40 hours of GP time. We have created excellent working relationships with local GPs and their practices and have worked to improve clinical communication and young peoples’ experiences. We have provided education events for GPs and have also been active within headspace National Office to advocate for these issues.

Concurrent Session: Oral Poster Session
Mental Health/ Mixed Themes

Kevin Shi: In-hospital acute behavioural disturbances in children and adolescents

Erin Devine: Odds on Youth - A Capacity Building Project to address gambling related harm among young people

Melissa C Miller: The Power of being an Everyday Leader: Youth Health Leadership Training

Divya Peter: Is Social Media Stress a Potential Risk to Mental Health? A Cross-sectional Study of Australian University Students

Sophia Garlick Bock: Empowering young people to make Positive Choices: Evidence-based resources for the prevention of alcohol and other drug use in Australian schools

Sally Gibson: Wellbeing and Health In-Reach Nurse (WHIN) Coordinator in the school setting: a pilot program to support young people in regional NSW

Concurrent 2
Concurrent 2

Morning Symposium
Julie Mooney-Somers: Using qualitative research methods to engage young people: a workshop about innovative methods and ethics

Objectives

Participants will learn:

Why qualitative research is so important in adolescent health research; The ethical and methodological considerations when using qualitative research methods with young people; When qualitative research methods are appropriate for program or intervention evaluation.

Process

The symposium will be delivered as an interactive workshop facilitated by academics specialising in qualitative research methods, design and implementation. The workshop will comprise an overview of qualitative research methods, specifically aimed at engaging young people, including examples of projects that have successfully engaged young people in ethically sensitive and inclusive ways. Participants are encouraged to submit brief case studies for discussion and problem solving on the day.

Content Summary

Overview of qualitative methods and principles, including innovative methods to engage young people in research across educational, clinical and community settings; Successful case studies to showcase different approaches to engaging with young people to generate data; Ethical and methodological considerations when engaging young people in qualitative research; Addressing sensitive topics through qualitative research; Working with young people in partnership to co-design research and resources; Using qualitative research methods to evaluate programs, interventions, and initiatives aimed at young people; Discussion and problem solving of workshop participants’ case studies and examples.

Expertise

The team bring extensive expertise in qualitative research methods and design, implementation, analysis and dissemination across academic, educational, clinical and community settings. We specialise in conducting ethical research about sensitive topics with young people using a variety of qualitative methods, including with populations experiencing chronic illness and marginalisation.

Concurrent Session: Oral Presentation
Sexual and Reproductive Health

Anisa R Assifi: Adolescent access to abortions in New South Wales: Key informants perspectives

Bright O Ahinkorah: Prevalence and Determinants of Adolescent Pregnancy in 30 Sub-Saharan Africa Countries: An analysis of Demographic and Health Surveys

Jennifer L Marino: Changing our approach to risk-taking in adolescence

Stephanie F Zwi, Renee Griffin: Let’s Talk 2019: Young Wom*n’s Views on Sex Education

Tara Hunter: Responding to adolescent sexual assault: obstacles and opportunities

Madeleine SY Lim: Sexual health behaviours and attitudes of Australian university students: a comparison between international and local students

Concurrent 3
Concurrent 3
Registration

Morning Symposium
Esther Walters: Hauora and wairua; keys to building resilience in our youth

Mental Illness and wellbeing is impacted by our culture and the known and the unwritten rules of our land. The stigma of illness, the gaps in our health care, the delay in treatment and the lack of ‘old fashioned values’ of kindness, loyalty and time to play continue to impact on the wellbeing of our rangatahi (young people).

Throughout the lifespan we acknowledge the impact of our whanau and the environment our young people journey through. The power of the messages encrypted in the media, the isolation 'devices' bring and the stigma of being young, vibrant and mentally unwell is all too well known as influencing negative outcomes. Our suicide rate is high and our society and government truely struggle to listen and walk in the shoes of our young people. History shapes us and our wairua defines us.

Young people want to be part of 'the village' to connect to self, to nature and to others. This seminar will explore the development of the sense of self, the art of play, connection and defining your village. As a participant you will be inspired by our young people as they will share and lead us on why they are part of and how they belong to our village. This is an action oriented workshop and we plan that you will develop further skills and understanding in the development of the sense of self and the importance of listening and connecting.

Keynote: Deborah Bateson - Medical Director Family Planning NSW
Sexual and Reproductive Rights and Young People

Deborah has worked as a clinician, educator, researcher and advocate in sexual and reproductive health and rights for 20 years. She is Medical Director of Family Planning NSW, Clinical Associate Professor at the University of Sydney and Adjunct Professor at the Centre for Social Research in Health at UNSW.

Adolescence is crucial time for laying the foundations of healthy sexual and reproductive lives and the experiences of young people during this time can have a significant impact on their later lives. While all young people have a right to make decisions that govern their bodies in relation to their sexuality and reproductive choices that are free of stigma, discrimination, and coercion, this right is denied to many.

Sexual and reproductive rights include the right to bodily integrity, to have pleasurable sexual experiences, to freely define one’s own sexuality, and to decide when, if and with whom to have children. In order to achieve optimal sexual and reproductive health young people need access to accurate information, resources, services and support. However, legal and policy barriers as well as harmful societal and gender norms can result in injustices.

In this presentation we will review the local and global challenges and opportunities in relation to key areas of sexual and reproductive rights and justice affecting young people. We will consider the barriers that lead to inequitable access to comprehensive sexuality education and to information and services relating to contraception, safe abortion and the prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted infections. We will also examine the related issues of menstrual equity and justice, female genital cutting and child marriage.

Sexual and reproductive health and rights are recognised within the 2015-2030 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. A focus on adolescents, who now comprise one sixth of the world’s population, will help ensure a positive impact on this influential generation.

Keynote: Elissa Kennedy - Co-Program Director, Maternal and Child Health, & Co-Head, Global Adolescent Health
Sexual and reproductive health of young people in Asia and the Pacific: challenges and opportunities

Elissa is Co-Program Director of Maternal and Child Health, and Co-Head of the Global Adolescent Health group at Burnet Institute. She is a medical doctor and public health researcher with more than a decade of experience in global health, with particular expertise in adolescent sexual and reproductive health research, policy, and programming in low- and middle-income countries.

Asia and the Pacific are home to almost one billion young people, accounting for more than a quarter of the population in this region, and over 60% of the world’s 10-24 year olds. These young people live in diverse sociocultural and economic contexts, yet they share important challenges and opportunities in relation to their sexual and reproductive health. Many young people in this region lack access to comprehensive sexuality education and information, have high unmet need for quality sexual and reproductive health services, and face considerable policy, legislative and sociocultural barriers, including rigid gender norms and gender inequality.

As a result, young people are at risk of poor outcomes such as early and unintended pregnancy, unsafe abortion, sexually transmitted infections, harmful practices (such as child marriage), and violence. There are, however, examples of innovative approaches in this region to overcome key barriers, and important opportunities to advance young people’s sexual and reproductive health and rights.

Morning Tea

Concurrent Session: Oral Presentation
Transition in Care


Jane Cooper: Part 1 - Does an on-campus clinic really meet the needs of the private provider, the patient and service providers ? - a diagnostic analysis

Jane Cooper: Part 2 - A collaborative approach leads to reinstatement of the On-Campus clinic in 2019.

Belinda L Tominc: Improving access for vulnerable young people to vaccinations: a nurse-led model

Lunch

AAAH Outstanding Contribution to Youth Health Award

AAAH Board of DirectorsThis award recognises the contribution of individuals to improving, promoting and supporting the health and wellbeing of young people in Australia. The Award presentation will summarise the contributions to youth health of all finalists and announce the winner for 2019.

Young people's plenary
Young people will lead this plenary session, providing their insights ideas and learning from the 2019 Youth Health Conference.

2020 Youth Health Conference, 2019 Closing Remarks

Concurrent 4
Concurrent 4

Morning Symposium
Kath Albury: Safety, sexual health and wellbeing on digital dating apps – what app-users want you to know

Objectives

This workshop introduces key findings of the ARC Linkage Project ‘Safety, risk and wellbeing on dating apps’, a partnership between Swinburne University of Technology, Sydney University, ACON Health Pty Ltd and Family Planning NSW.

Participants will leave the workshop with a basic understanding of:

The range of apps and social media platforms that Australians of diverse genders and sexualities use to connect with new partners for casual hook-ups and/or longer-term relationships; The aspects of app design and app culture that make users feel safer or less safe; The strategies dating app users draw on to feel happier and safer using when apps and meeting up with new partners; The information and services Australian app users want from health professionals and health organisations.

Process

The symposia combines a mini-lecture format with small and large group discussion, and personal reflection activities. Participants will be provided with ‘cheat-sheet’ resources to share with their colleagues.

Content Summary

Content is drawn from the findings of a 2 year multi-methods project combining an online survey of Australian app users; workshops and interviews with NSW dating app users aged 18-35 (including LBGTQ+ and straight users); and a series of Reference Group consultations with app users and professionals in the fields of sexuality education, health promotion and youth services. The workshop focuses on key findings relating to: managing mental health and personal wellbeing; negotiating consent and safer sex; and dealing with harassment/abuse.

Expertise

Kath Albury is Professor of Media and Communication at Swinburne University of Technology. She is the Lead Investigator on the Safety, risk and wellbeing on dating apps Linkage project, and has over 30 years of experience facilitating workshops and knowledge translation activities with health professionals.

Concurrent Session: Oral Presentations
Youth Leadership and Participation

Aish Naidu: Introducing the Wellbeing Health & Youth Commission: Networked Youth Engagement

Sandra Vale: 250K – ENGAGING TEENS AND YOUNG ADULTS WITH SEVERE ALLERGIES

Greg McGahan: Building a Young Adult Health Centre: Tips, traps and learnings

Veronica Sheanova: How do young people feel about their participation? Feedback from young people on a Youth Advisory Committee.

Jo Durham: Learning from Beyond the Reef - a community-arts and well-being programme for young Pasifika people

Luke Rycken: Co-Design and Youth Participation: Youth Affairs Council Victoria’s Approach to Improving the Mental Health System in Rural and Regional Victoria

Concurrent 5
Concurrent 5

Morning Symposium
Justine Whitby, Katiska Davis, Chris McKay, Simone Sherriff, Robyn Williams, Patricia Cullen, Sanra Eades, Rebecca Ivers, Lina Gubhaju: Building the capacity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander researchers: Sharing and learning from experiences of trainees and mentors from the Centre for Research Excellence in Aboriginal Child and Adolescent Health (CRE REACH)

Objectives:

Building the capacity of Aboriginal researchers is essential for the health and social wellbeing of Aboriginal people. This workshop will be targeted towards young Aboriginal people thinking about a career in research, as well as mentors of Aboriginal students and researchers. By the end of this workshop, participants will have knowledge about:

1) The various research pathways of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander trainees in child and adolescent health research

2) The barriers and enablers of a research journey for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander researchers

3) Effective ways of mentoring Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander researchers to reach their career aspirations

4) Practical strategies researchers can implement at their own institutes to build the health research capacity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Throughout the lifespan we acknowledge the impact of our whanau and the environment our young people journey through. The power of the messages encrypted in the media, the isolation 'devices' bring and the stigma of being young, vibrant and mentally unwell is all too well known as influencing negative outcomes. Our suicide rate is high and our society and government truely struggle to listen and walk in the shoes of our young people. History shapes us and our wairua defines us.

Process:

The workshop will be delivered through brief presentations by trainees and mentors followed by an interactive discussion about research career pathways for young Aboriginal people. In small groups, participants will also get an opportunity to share their own strategies and plans to build the capacity of Aboriginal health researchers. There will be an opportunity to share knowledge about what has worked and has not worked within their own institutes. The workshop may also serve as a platform to form linkages between potential mentors and trainees.

Content:

Our panel will include trainees and mentors:

1) Peer recruiters/data collectors involved in the ‘Next Generation: Youth Wellbeing Study’

2) PhD candidates

3) Research assistants

4) Post-doctoral researchers

5) Early/mid-career researchers

Each person will briefly present on their journey, the barriers and enablers that they have faced and future aspirations.

Summary:

Our CRE REACH trainees and mentors have a wealth of knowledge and experience that will be beneficial to share with young Aboriginal people aspiring for a career in health research and those in a mentoring role.

Concurrent Session: Oral Presentations
Youth Leadership and Participation/Mixed Themes

John Howard: From bullied to bully: experiences of bullying among Bhutanese college students and implications for teacher formation programmes

Imogen Aitken: Youth-led Program Development at the Starlight Children's Foundation

Melissa Miller: The essential recipe for tasty ChIPS!

Michelle Raggatt: “FACEBOOK IS DYING”: UPDATING HOW WE RECRUIT AND CONDUCT RESEARCH WITH YOUNG PEOPLE ON SENSITIVE HEALTH TOPICS

John Howard: A brief intervention for cannabis use to increase the capacity of those who work with young cannabis users to engage and enhance motivation for change

AAAH Annual General Meeting

Friday 29th November

Key Dates

Abstract authors notified:23 August 2019
Earlybird registration closes:13 October 2019