AAAH Youth Health Conference 2019 Program

AAAH Youth Health Conference 2019 Program

07:00
07:30
08:00
08:30
09:00
09:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
13:00
13:30
14:00
14:30
15:00
15:30
16:00
16:30
17:00
17:30
18:00
18:30
19:00
19:30
20:00
Wednesday 27th November
Wednesday 27th November
Registration
07:00 - 08:30

Conference Opening
08:30 - 09:15

Keynote: Kareem El-Ansary
09:15 - 09:50

The world is becoming increasingly polarised. We see a rise of nationalism and popularism, For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people this brings unique challenges. Young people who are just starting to find their way, develop their identity and forge their way in the world this adds they face additional pressures. The unique pressures Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people face are usually ignored in favour of a pan Australia approach or only superficially addressed.Not only are the challenges primarily ignored, but the unique strengths and contributions also are often Aboriginal, and Torres Strait Islander people can contribute to Australia are not well understood. Aboriginal and Torrs Strait Islander young people are often portrayed as either the sinner or the saint. What impact does the ongoing marginalisation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have on them? And needs to be done to ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander succeed? Success as defined by them.With young people make up more than half of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population under the age of 25. They are our future. They are our emerging leaders. As health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people improve the young ones will be the Elders for the future. But is Australia ready for them?

Keynote: George Patton
09:50 - 10:30
The Middle Years in Health and Human Development: findings from the Childhood to Adolescent Transition Study (CATS)

The years from mid-primary through to early secondary school are sometimes called the ‘middle years’. It is a foundational life phase for all aspects of health and human development. It coincides for most with the transition through puberty. It is also the time of perhaps the most significant transition in educational life with the move from primary to secondary school. These are years of enormous growth both physically and emotionally and formative in terms of mental health and later-life resilience. Yet these years have been neglected in research with the predominant focus of most studies on the early years or later adolescence. This presentation will summarise some of the learnings from a unique Australian study of these years: the Childhood to Adolescence Transition Study (CATS). CATS has tracked an initial sample of over 1200 grade 3 children and their families annually on their journey through puberty to late secondary school. The study sits at the interface of health and education research, documenting major developmental determinants of both mental health and academic achievement.

Morning Tea
10:30 - 11:00

Youth Forum (Young People Only)
11:00 - 12:30

Concurrent Sessions
11:00 - 12:30

Lunch
12:30 - 13:30

Keynote: Summer May Finlay
13:30 - 14:05
Walking in the footsteps of ancestors: young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people making their way in a new world

The world is becoming increasingly polarised. We see a rise of nationalism and popularism, For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people this brings unique challenges. Young people who are just starting to find their way, develop their identity and forge their way in the world this adds they face additional pressures. The unique pressures Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people face are usually ignored in favour of a pan Australia approach or only superficially addressed.Not only are the challenges primarily ignored, but the unique strengths and contributions also are often Aboriginal, and Torres Strait Islander people can contribute to Australia are not well understood. Aboriginal and Torrs Strait Islander young people are often portrayed as either the sinner or the saint. What impact does the ongoing marginalisation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have on them? And needs to be done to ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander succeed? Success as defined by them.With young people make up more than half of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population under the age of 25. They are our future. They are our emerging leaders. As health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people improve the young ones will be the Elders for the future. But is Australia ready for them?

Keynote: Andrew Fuller
14:05 - 14:45
From Surviving to Thriving- Engaging Tricky Teens

Tricky teens often do the same things in the same ways over and over again. Having spent most of a lifetime thinking about ‘what the hell do I do now?’ with these kids Andrew will share some thoughts and methods he has found worked … most of the time.

Launch of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Youth Health Position Paper

Afternoon Tea
15:00 - 15:30

Youth Forum (Young People Only)
15:30 - 17:00

Concurrent Sessions
15:30 - 17:00

Welcome Reception
17:30 - 19:30

Thursday 28th November
Thursday 28th November
Registration
07:00 - 08:30

Keynote: Georgie Harman
09:00 - 09:45
The time is now: structural reform for better mental health for generations to come

We know that childhood experiences shape the adults we become and that mental health in the foundation years can affect the course of the rest of our lives. Children who have good mental health and the resilience to bounce back from early adversity can carry it with them through adulthood and pass it on to the generations that follow. Georgie Harman, CEO of Beyond Blue, looks into the challenges that lie ahead in closing gaps in critical areas for prevention and early intervention, nurturing resilience through everyday strategies, mobilising community-based supports and the importance of developing an integrated system that promotes wellbeing for all.

Keynote: Stuart Kinner
09:45 - 10:30
Health inequalities and the youth justice system

Adolescents who have contact with the youth justice system are distinguished by entrenched and often intergenerational disadvantage, histories of trauma and neglect, and a high prevalence of co-occurring health and neurodevelopmental difficulties. Contact with the youth justice system provides rare opportunities to identify and initiate care for under-treated health conditions, and address social determinants of health such as education and housing. However, at present remarkably little is known about the health of justice-involved adolescents in Australia, and investment in efforts to improve their health outcomes is woefully inadequate. Addressing the health-related needs of justice-involved adolescents is important to reducing health inequalities at the population level and, given the marked over-representation of young Indigenous people in the youth justice system, to closing the gap.

Morning Tea
10:30 - 11:00

Concurrent Sessions
11:00 - 12:30

Lunch
12:30 - 13:30

Panel 'Raising our Voice: advocacy and owning future change': Michelle Telfer, Isabelle Langley, Cristyn Davies
13:30 - 14:15

Keynote: Susan Sawyer
14:15 - 15:00
The Age of Adolescence

How we conceptualise and define adolescence influences the scope and focus of laws, policies and programmes that are intended to protect and empower young people. Different terms are used to define children, adolescents, youth and young people, with overlapping age definitions. This presentation will highlight why more recent definitions of adolescence extend it from 10-19 years to 10-24 years. Examples will be presented of how the age scope of particular laws, social policies and service systems can be viewed in relation to the notion of balancing the value of engaging young people as active participants against the perceived risks that warrant a continuing level of care and protection.

Afternoon Tea
15:00 - 15:30

Concurrent Sessions
15:30 - 17:00

Friday 29th November
Friday 29th November
90 Minute Symposium
07:45 - 09:15

Keynote: Deborah Bateson
09:30 - 10:15
Sexual and Reproductive Rights and Young People

Adolescence is crucial time for laying the foundations of healthy sexual and reproductive lives and the experiences of young people during this time can have a significant impact on their later lives. While all young people have a right to make decisions that govern their bodies in relation to their sexuality and reproductive choices that are free of stigma, discrimination, and coercion, this right is denied to many. Sexual and reproductive rights include the right to bodily integrity, to have pleasurable sexual experiences, to freely define one’s own sexuality, and to decide when, if and with whom to have children. In order to achieve optimal sexual and reproductive health young people need access to accurate information, resources, services and support. However, legal and policy barriers as well as harmful societal and gender norms can result in injustices. In this presentation we will review the local and global challenges and opportunities in relation to key areas of sexual and reproductive rights and justice affecting young people. We will consider the barriers that lead to inequitable access to comprehensive sexuality education and to information and services relating to contraception, safe abortion and the prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted infections. We will also examine the related issues of menstrual equity and justice, female genital cutting and child marriage. Sexual and reproductive health and rights are recognised within in the 2015-2030 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. A focus on adolescents, who now comprise one sixth of the world’s population, will help ensure a positive impact on this influential generation.

Keynote: Elissa Kennedy
10:15 - 11:00
Sexual and reproductive health of young people in Asia and the Pacific: challenges and opportunities

Asia and the Pacific are home to almost one billion young people, accounting for more than a quarter of the population in this region, and over 60% of the world’s 10-24 year olds. These young people live in diverse sociocultural and economic contexts, yet they share important challenges and opportunities in relation to their sexual and reproductive health. Many young people in this region lack access to comprehensive sexuality education and information, have high unmet need for quality sexual and reproductive health services, and face considerable policy, legislative and sociocultural barriers, including rigid gender norms and gender inequality. As a result, young people are at risk of poor outcomes such as early and unintended pregnancy, unsafe abortion, sexually transmitted infections, harmful practices (such as child marriage), and violence. There are, however, examples of innovative approaches in this region to overcome key barriers, and important opportunities to advance young people’s sexual and reproductive health and rights.

Morning Tea
11:00 - 11:30

Concurrent Sessions
11:30 - 13:00

Lunch
13:00 - 14:30

AAAH Annual General Meeting
13:15 - 14:15

AAAH Outstanding Contribution to Youth Health Award

Young people's plenary
14:45 - 15:45

2020 Youth Health Conference, 2019 Closing Remarks

AAAH Youth Health Conference 2019 Program

Key Dates

Abstract authors notified:23 August 2019
Earlybird registration closes:13 October 2019